Podiatrist Blog

By Carmel Foot & Ankle
January 15, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bunions  

Bunion TreatmentGot bunions? A bunion is a bony prominence that forms on the joint at the base of the big toe. Bunions can be extremely painful. Many individuals unnecessarily suffer the pain of bunions for years before seeking treatment. Because bunions are progressive, they usually get worse without treatment. Dr. Jeffrey Agricola at Prestige Podiatry, with offices in Carmel and Indianapolis, IN, offers treatments for bunions. 

About Bunions

Bunions are often referred to as hallux valgus. A bunion is an unnatural, bony bump on the side of the big toe. Bunions can be mild, moderate, or severe. This deformity will gradually increase and may make it painful to walk. Bunions can last for years or be lifelong. 

Causes of Bunions

Bunions are often caused by wearing footwear that is too tight across the toes. Bunions occur mostly in women, as they are more likely to wear high heels and narrow shoes. Some conditions, such as arthritis can also cause bunions. Bunions can also run in families. Certain foot types make people prone to developing bunions. 

Symptoms of Bunions

Bunions often cause inflammation and pain around the joint at the base of the affected toe. The skin may become warm or red. Symptoms may also include a burning sensation or numbness. Some people with bunions have sores between the toes or calluses on the big toe. In some cases, bunions cause no symptoms.

Diagnosing Bunions

In most cases, a podiatrist can diagnose a bunion though physical exam. During the exam, your podiatrist may ask you to move your toe back and forth to check for limited movement. Your Carmel and Indianapolis podiatrist may order an X-ray to determine the degree of the deformity. Once your doctor has evaluated your condition, a treatment plan that is suited to your needs can be developed.

Treatment of Bunions

To treat your bunion, your Carmel and Indianapolis podiatrist may recommend a medication to reduce the discomfort and inflammation. Your doctor may pad and tape your bunion to keep it in a normal position. Padding and taping the bunion can ease your pain and prevent your bunion from getting worse. In some cases, orthotics may be provided by the podiatrist. In some cases, surgery is required to treat a bunion.

Don't let a bunion hold you back in life. Call Prestige Podiatry at 317-846-4111 today to schedule an appointment in Carmel, IN. Call 317-881-0070 to schedule an appointment in Indianapolis, IN. We will help you get rid of that bunion once and for all. We want you to live your best possible life!

By Carmel Foot & Ankle
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Health

Have you been having persistent trouble with your feet or ankles? Conservative treatments, including physical therapy exercises and orthotics, can do wonders with patience and consistency. But some patients need foot or ankle surgery to correct their problems. Get an idea of when  foot  or ankle surgery may be needed and find out for sure by visiting podiatrist Dr. Jeffrey Agricola at Prestige Podiatry in Carmel or Indianapolis, IN.

Types of Foot or Ankle Surgery
Podiatrists use a variety of surgical techniques to correct foot and ankle problems. Here are some of the types of surgeries recommended for patients with various ailments:

- Bunionectomy (to remove or realign unsightly bunion deformities).
- Ankle arthroplasty (joints in the ankle are reconstructed or replaced).
- Metatarsal foot surgery (fixes issues related to the ball of the foot).
- Plantar fascia release (part of the ligament is cut to relieve tension and heel pain).
- Fusion surgeries (fuses bones together to help alleviate arthritic symptoms).

When Is Foot Surgery Needed?
Doctors and their patients usually prefer to go with conservative, non-invasive methods of correcting foot problems. That may include wearing specialized orthotics each day, getting corticosteroid injections for pain, or doing physical therapy. But when these methods do not correct the problem in a reasonable amount of time, or the issue has become potentially disabling, your Carmel and Indianapolis, IN  podiatrist  may suggest surgery.

Aftercare for Foot and Ankle Surgery
Some foot and ankle surgeries are done rather quickly, and you can go home the same day. But caring for your feet after the surgery is crucial to the entire process. Expect to take at least a few weeks off from your usual activities (depends on doctor’s orders) for proper healing. Use icing and heat techniques as suggested by your podiatrist to keep down inflammation or swelling and relieve pain. You’ll likely need to attend regular sessions with your podiatrist to do physical therapy exercises for the best results.

Have Your Feet Evaluated
Let a podiatrist at Prestige Podiatry in Carmel or Indianapolis, IN take a closer look at your feet, including a physical exam and scans. You may be a good candidate for foot or ankle surgery. Call (317) 846-4111 or (317) 881-0070 today to schedule your appointment with Dr. Jeffrey Agricola.

By Carmel Foot & Ankle
November 09, 2018
Category: Foot Health
Tags: Calluses  

CallusesIf you have a flat, rough patch of skin on your feet or toes, you likely have a callus, which affects most adults by the time they turn 65 years old. While many people don't experience any problems with their calluses, others may experience pain while wearing shoes and walking or standing due to pressure against the protruding area of dead skin. Dr. Jeffrey Agricola, your foot doctor at Prestige Podiatry in Carmel and Indianapolis, IN, is well-trained in helping his patients manage painful calluses.

How calluses form

The reason why your skin forms calluses is actually a good sign that your immune system is working properly. The skin responds to the repeated friction, perceiving it as a potential injury, so it begins to "toughen up," becoming thick and coarse to prevent a wound from forming. Calluses commonly form where your foot comes into contact with either your shoe or the ground: on the soles of the feet, both the ball and the heel areas, as well as the outside edge of the big toe or pinky toe.

Treating painful calluses

Not all calluses cause pain, but if you're experiencing discomfort in the area where a callus has formed, your Carmel and Indianapolis foot doctor can help you. People with diabetes and other issues with circulation and nerve response who develop calluses, painful or not, should contact their podiatrist immediately to prevent any secondary infections from developing. Dr. Agricola may recommend a custom shoe insert to redistribute the pressure on your feet or a change in footwear. He may also apply a salicylic acid solution to the callus, which will help break it down and then shave or cut the dead skin away. Salicylic acid has long been used to treat warts.

If you're experiencing foot pain of any kind, Dr. Jeffrey Agricola is here to help you! Contact Prestige Podiatry at either of our Indiana-based locations - Indianapolis or Carmel - for an appointment today!

By Carmel Foot & Ankle
November 06, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bunions  

Find out if your achy big toe could be the result of a bunion.

Foot BunionA lot of people will develop a bunion at some point during their lifetime. This deformity, typically affecting the joint at the base of your big toe, shows up gradually over the years. It’s important that you turn to our Carmel and Indianapolis, IN podiatrist, Dr. Jeffrey Agricola, if you suspect that your foot pain may be due to a bunion so that you know what to do to prevent it from getting worse.

How do I know that I have a bunion?

It’s pretty easy to determine if you have a bunion just by checking your feet. Take a second to check out your feet. Now, look at the base of your big toe. Is there a hard, bony mass that sticks out? Does your big toe lean in toward the smaller toes? If so, you could be dealing with a bunion.

If you have a bunion, simply standing or walking will put excessive pressure on the deformity, which can make it painful or uncomfortable to walk. You may also find that your shoes no longer fit like they once did and now they rub against the bunion, an effect that often causes a callus to form.

How are bunions treated?

If our Carmel and Indianapolis foot doctor informs you that you have a bunion, you may be wondering how to correct the issue. While surgery is the only definitive way to repair the deformity, surgery isn’t recommended unless the bunion is severe and greatly impacts your ability to walk.

Luckily, there are simple at-home care measures that you can implement into your daily routine to prevent the bunion from getting worse or causing issues. It’s important that you are wearing the proper shoes to protect your foot and to provide ample support and cushioning. Shoes that are too tight and bunch up the toes will only make your bunion worse. Make sure your toes are able to wiggle and move around within your shoes.

You might also benefit from getting custom orthotics from our podiatrist. Orthotics can provide further support and take some pressure and weight off the bunion. You may also choose to splint or brace your foot at night to improve the alignment of the big toe to reduce pain and inflammation.

Contact us today!

Don’t let bunion pain become the norm for you when there are so many simple measures you can take every day to make sure that your feet feel their best! Just because you have a bunion doesn’t mean that you have to put up with foot problems. If bunions are causing you issues, it’s time to turn to the foot experts at Prestige Podiatry in Indianapolis and Carmel, IN, by calling either (317) 881-0070 or (317) 846-4111 for our respective offices.

Foot and Ankle InjuryDr. Jeffrey Agricola, your foot doctor at Prestige Podiatry in Carmel and Indianapolis, IN, is a sports enthusiast. So, in addition to his extensive training in podiatric sports injuries, he well understands the pain, worry and immobility sudden or repetitive injuries can cause. Learn more here about common sports injuries, how they're treated and what you can do to avoid them.

What's the most common injury?

It's the ankle sprain, says the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. A stretching and tearing of the three supporting ligaments of the ankle (especially the one on the outside of the ankle), ankle sprains cause considerable pain, swelling, redness, and limited mobility and range of motion. Usually, the lateral twisting motions associated with running on an uneven surface or slipping on wet pavement cause sprains.

Upon visual inspection and X-ray examination of your extremity, your foot doctor will grade the severity of your sprained ankle and base his conservative treatment plan on that grade. Only the worst cases of sprained ankle require surgical stabilization, but many sprains need:

  • Rest
  • Ice
  • Compression with an elastic bandage to reduce swelling and provide support
  • Elevation above heart level
  • Over-the-counter analgesics to control pain
  • Physical therapy and strengthening exercises
  • Soft casting and crutches (as needed) to limit weight bearing

As with many other injuries related to sports, both amateur and professional athletes can prevent ankle sprains with common sense strategies such as:

  • Adequate warning up and stretching before your activity
  • Staying in good physical condition
  • Keeping within normal weight limits
  • Wearing quality footwear with adequate support
  • Allowing sprains and other injuries adequate time to heal

Other injuries

Many sports injuries do not happen suddenly with traumatic force but with the repeated stresses of running and jumping, placing undue pressure on various foot and ankle structures. For example, tennis, dancing and running, which basically pound the foot over and over again, cause injuries such as:

  • Stress fractures, fine cracks in the bones of the foot or ankle
  • Sesamoiditis, inflammation of the sesamoid bones underneath the big toe
  • Plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the broad connective tissue between the heel and big toes
  • Heel spurs, small bony protrusions at the front of the calcaneus, or heel bone
  • Achilles tendonitis which affects the tendon between the heel and the calf

Your Indianapolis foot doctor sees these injuries at Prestige Podiatry. He carefully evaluates symptoms, does a hands-on exam and takes X-rays images or other tests as needed. From there, he writes a care plan aimed at recovery of mobility, reduction of pain and prevention of further injury.

Are you athletic?

Actually, anyone who is very active is prone to sports injuries. So, if you're experiencing foot or ankle pain, swelling or dysfunction, call Prestige Podiatry today for a consultation with Dr. Jeffrey Agricola. For the Indianapolis office, call (317) 881-0070. For Carmel, phone (317) 846-4111.





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